In Defense of Angela Merkel

by Bernard-Henri Lévy

PARIS – The ecent cover of Der Spiegel showing German Chancellor Angela Merkel in front of the Acropolis surrounded by Nazi officers serves an important purpose: it finally poses, in a way that cannot be evaded, the question of Germanophobia in Europe.

der spiegel
The abuse of Germany has dragged on for quite some time. Demonstrations in Cyprus in March 2013 included banners bearing caricatures of Merkel done up as Adolf Hitler. In Valencia at around the same time, on the occasion of the annual Fallas celebration, there was Merkel as an evil headmistress delivering to the head of the Spanish government and his ministers “The Ten Commandments of Angela the Exterminator.” She ended up being burned in effigy in the flames of the bonfires of St. Joseph.

Two months later, in Portugal, similar parades featured the same Hitlerized Merkel caricatures, borne by howling demonstrators dressed in mourning clothes and decrying the German leader’s “policy of massacring the poor.”

And, naturally, there was Greece, where the phenomenon reached its apogee during the near-riots of October 2012, in which the world was treated to the spectacle of Nazi and German flags flown together – and then burned – together before the Acropolis in scenes that presaged the Der Spiegel cover.

In Italy, the right-wing daily newspaper Il Giornale had no scruples about devoting its headline for August 3, 2012, to the emergence of the “Fourth Reich.” Likewise, conspiracy websites in the countries of northern Europe claim that Germany’s eagerness to support Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko against Russian President Vladimir Putin is a reenactment of Hitler’s subjugation of Ukraine.

Then there is France, where the game seems to be to see who can come out on top in populist denunciations of the new and detestable “German empire.” From the extreme right, National Front leader Marine Le Pen chides Merkel for the “suffering” that she is imposing on the peoples of Europe. From the opposite extreme, we have the Left Party’s Jean-Luc Mélenchon thundering against Merkel’s “austerity” policy and inviting her to “shut up.”

The problem with this Germanophobia is not simply that it is stupid, or that it is yet another symptom of the decomposition, before our eyes, of the noble European project of integration and ever-closer union.

No, the problem with today’s Germanophobia is that, contrary to what the sorcerer’s apprentices who stoke it would have us believe, their behavior is not a sign of their opposition to the true fascism that lies on the horizon, but rather of their allegiance – and even contribution – to it. Why?

Pages: 1 2 3

You may also like...